Category: 23andme

9/5/17: Answering an Ethnonationalist

Knocking down the strawmen.

First, to characterize race-first White nationalists as people obsessed with 23andMe results (or who believe “Russians are the same as the Irish”) is as much a caricature as saying all European ethnonationalists want to re-fight World War II.  In each case, you can find some who fit the description, but hardly most, much less all.

See this on 23andMe and related tests

Even in the US white nationalism is failed as a concept. Cajuns, Alaskans and Minnesotans are not the same people.

If WN has failed it has been due to poor leadership and freakish fossilized dogma, not due to the fact that we haven’t atomized ourselves enough!  Two Alaskan families are “not the same people as well” – perhaps each family should establish their own micro-state (or igloo-state)?

There is a reason why your founding fathers created the united states and not a state. 

America is hardly the same nation made by the Founders.  Local identities ultimately fail in America because the USA is so heavily “diverse.”   Minnesotans can be Somalis.  Alaskans can be Inuit. Christian Midwesterners can be illegal Mexicans brought in for a meat-packing plant. Boston liberals can be Jews.  If you say then you are talking about White Alaskans and White Minnesotans and White Midwesterners and White Bostonians – well, yes, what do they have in common – racethey are White. In America, that’s the glue that holds it all together.  Without race, local identities can – and do – devolve in to cucked civic nationalism. Let all the “people of Houston” stick together in the face of a natural catastrophe! Whites, Blacks, Browns – they all got that “south Texas” identity, don’t you know.

I would recommend white nationalists in the US to focus more on the regional and what makes them unique instead of trying to invent a bond between them and very different people on the other side of the continent.

European activists get frustrated with “uninformed Yanks” who “misunderstand Europe” and give “low-information advice.”  Well, that goes both ways.  Imagining America as a big Europe while every other person (nearly) is a racial alien of some kind does not work.  A White American who is racially aware (or at least not cucked) has much more in  common with a similar White American “on the other side of the continent” as they do with cucked Whites, or non-Whites, who share similar local cultural markers and identities.  If Europeans cannot understand the overwhelming importance of race in America and American history, then their advice is not helpful.

Also race isn’t really a necessary discussion in Europe since there are extraordinarily few Slovakians who aren’t white. 

But it is absolutely essential in America for the converse reason.  And is it really immaterial in Slovakia?  I read somewhere they are headed for majority Roma status – I presume you don’t consider gypsies to be White.  And beyond that – in today’s globalist society, the aliens are “just around the corner” – even in Slovakia.

Different people of European origin still need to stick together for the common good. 

Eliminate the word “still” and you are getting it.

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Another 23andMe Fail

In a word: hogwash.

I’ve seen the “timeline” “data” from a number of people, and it’s all been as absurd as that (or more so).   If DNAPrint as “bad,” how is 23andMe better? In a gross sense it is, but in a net sense, compared to the “state of the art” at the time, and given what we should expect in 2017, and given Der Movement fantasies about absolute accuracy and precision, it’s not. For majority ancestry, no problem, but for fine-grained analyses – not good at all.

And when are any of these companies going to provide genetic kinship data to established ethnic and racial categories?  Of course, academic population geneticists shy away from genetic kinship data as well – after all, we can’t let the rubes know who they are most related to, can we?  I mean, they might get all, like, racist on us and all.

Sallis Agrees With the Alt Right on Something

Some good sense.

I essentially agree with and endorse this article, with some caveats, and it should be read together with this piece I wrote several years ago.

The AltRight.com article is reasonably sound, although one caveat is that if one approaches these tests with a sense of realism with respect to their limitations – limitations spelled out in my Counter-Currents piece – then getting tested may not be a bad idea.  Having the raw data could be useful if you can find someone who can do a genetic kinship analysis with it. But taking the details of the data literally – thinking that there’s a real difference between 100% A, 0% B vs. 99.3% A, 0.7% B, for example – is ludicrous. I would take even the 90% confidence readings with a large grain of salt, and the 50% confidence readings are so absurd that the salt grain needs to be the size of the iceberg that sunk the Titanic.

The other caveat to the article is that the comments section is mixed; some comments are useful, some are asinine, so caveat emptor.

There are two basic questions here.

1. Is 23andMe a good test?

2. Assuming an ancestry test is good, is it worthwhile?

To which I answer: 1) No and 2) Maybe, depending on context.

In an absolute sense, 23andMe is superior to DNAPrint’s tests from ~15 years ago; in a relative sense – comparing each test to the “state of  the art” available at the time – it really isn’t better at all.  With the level of understanding and methodology we have today, coupled with a prudent interpretation of the data, one could do much better.

What if a test was sound?  Well, sure, it can be interesting, but I’ll repeat something I’ve been hammering home here over the past few years – the only biopolitically relevant genetic metric is genetic kinship (at all levels of genetic integration).  If one can measure that, then it is useful. All else can be interesting, but not directly important from an EGI standpoint.

And if people are going to hysterically obsess over sub-fractional admixture percentages then this is missing the forest for the trees.

Race in the News, 8/27/16

Several items.
A lot in this article is highly stupid politicized nonsense, but this:

I asked Wells whether my percentage breakdowns of Korean, Chinese, and Japanese meant anything. “Yes,” he said, “but I think it is misleading to go to a decimal place or even to go out two digits.”

Likely has some merit. As a crude, off-the-cuff opinion, I’d say that anything less than 10% is open to reasonable skepticism, less than 5% to more stringent skepticism, and anything in the range of 1% or less is more or less ludicrous (unless strong, reproducible, and definitive evidence is given to say otherwise).
And it’s not only Koreans and such groups that have poor coverage. There are Europeans who, at the higher levels of “significance,” have really large amounts of “unassigned” ancestry.
At best this is marginally better then DNAPrint…about 15 years later. I guess though to get Der Movement to be a bit more skeptical I should praise the test, which will provoke the opposite reaction.
So: 23andme is really good, it’s the best!
The “goddess” Coulter is a documented mudshark, and the “god emperor” Trump is cuckily backpedaling faster than a LSD-dazed clown on a unicycle.

“Suddenly, I just became a huge mainstream celebrity in the intellectual world,” says D’Souza, who was inundated with speaking invitations. He also became a hot commodity among blonde conservatives. After dating Laura Ingraham and then Ann Coulter, he found the ultimate prize in Dixie Brubaker, a beautiful blonde from a conservative California family, whom he had met while working in the White House; they married in 1992. D’Souza admits, “It was my mission to marry the all-American girl.”

Race in the News, 8/6/16

Or should that read Der News?

“…the storm has only begun to gather,” indeed.
Der Movement’s favorite genetics company continues its long decline, emphasis added:

Some outdated or underused features have been discontinued in the new 23andMe experience.

These features include:
DNA Melody
Haplogroup Tree Mutation Mapper
Inheritance Calculator
ABO Blood Lab

Global Similarity

Profile SmartSearch
Family Inheritance Genome View
Reynold’s Risk Score Lab

Sure, I mean why would anyone care to know what groups they are more or less genetically similar to at the global level? After all, dat be rayciss and all.